From the Cincinnati Daily Times, November 12, 1860. pg 3, col 2

From the Cincinnati Daily Times, November 12, 1860. pg 3, col 2


Human life must be some kind of a mistake.
Arthur Schopenhauer, The Vanity of Existence (1893)

from the Cincinnati Gazette, October 27, 1876, page 8

from the Cincinnati Gazette, October 27, 1876, page 8


From To Be Or Not To Be: A Study of Suicide by Louis I. Dublin & Bessie Bunzel, 1933


From the Cincinnati Post, September 22, 1948.

From the Cincinnati Post, September 22, 1948.


Horrible Murder and Suicide.
By the passengers who came in the cars from New Haven, on Tuesday, we learn that a most horrible murder and suicide had been committed early on the morning of that day, at Wallingford.
It seems that an individual by the name of Hotchkiss, had for some time been living in unlawful connection with a married woman named Harriet Allen. A divorce had a short time previous been obtained by this woman from her husband, and she was to have married Hotchkiss, on Sunday next. Some difficulty arose between them in regard to the wedding day, and on Monday night last, Hotchkiss returned from N. Haven, where he had purchased some N.E. Rum, and drank a large quantity.
About 6 o’clock on Tuesday morning, he took an axe and went to the room where his intended wife was sleeping with her mother in the same bed, and with one blow of the axe split open her head, and repeated his blows till her head and breast were cut to pieces. He then went into an adjoining room and, with a jackknife, cut his own throat so as to occasion his death in a very short time.
This is certainly one of the most horrible deeds of blood and murder that ever disgraced the annals of our State, and makes no less than the seventh or eighth murder committed in the State within the year. It is supposed by some that the murder was committed in a fit of jealousy and a desperation excited by that monster of so many crimes RUM! We shall send a reporter on Monday to obtain the full particulars of this most dreadful affair, and publish them in our next.
From The New England Weekly Review (Hartford, CT) Saturday, October 24, 1840, pg. 43, col. C.

Horrible Murder and Suicide.

By the passengers who came in the cars from New Haven, on Tuesday, we learn that a most horrible murder and suicide had been committed early on the morning of that day, at Wallingford.

It seems that an individual by the name of Hotchkiss, had for some time been living in unlawful connection with a married woman named Harriet Allen. A divorce had a short time previous been obtained by this woman from her husband, and she was to have married Hotchkiss, on Sunday next. Some difficulty arose between them in regard to the wedding day, and on Monday night last, Hotchkiss returned from N. Haven, where he had purchased some N.E. Rum, and drank a large quantity.

About 6 o’clock on Tuesday morning, he took an axe and went to the room where his intended wife was sleeping with her mother in the same bed, and with one blow of the axe split open her head, and repeated his blows till her head and breast were cut to pieces. He then went into an adjoining room and, with a jackknife, cut his own throat so as to occasion his death in a very short time.

This is certainly one of the most horrible deeds of blood and murder that ever disgraced the annals of our State, and makes no less than the seventh or eighth murder committed in the State within the year. It is supposed by some that the murder was committed in a fit of jealousy and a desperation excited by that monster of so many crimes RUM! We shall send a reporter on Monday to obtain the full particulars of this most dreadful affair, and publish them in our next.

From The New England Weekly Review (Hartford, CT) Saturday, October 24, 1840, pg. 43, col. C.


ULYSSES, (TOMP. Col, N. Y.,) April 4, ‘46.—SUICIDE OF AN OLD MAN.—Yesterday afternoon a man about 70 years of age was discovered dead in the woods, about half a mile from Trumansburg.  He had taken life by a double process.  When found he was suspended by the neck with two strands of a rope from the limb of a tree.  A few steps from him lay his budget; upon it lay his knife and razor, the latter quite bloody.  His throat was cut in two place, but both too high, or near the chin to effect a speedy death.  Near his budget was a pool of blood, where he undoubtedly had sat and bled.  But finding so severe a struggle between life and death, he made a finishing stroke by hanging himself; though it can hardly be called hanging, for his knees touched the ground.  It appears that after cutting his throat he untwisted a small rope and took one strand, attached it to the limb of a tree, then made a slipping noose and placed his head through it; this was found broken.  He then took two strands, and succeeded in his object.  His name was David Baker.  I learn that he lived in Washington county, had a nice house and lot, and was withal a man of good character.
from The Boston Daily Atlas, (Boston, MA) Wednesday, April 29, 1846, pg. 1, col. E

ULYSSES, (TOMP. Col, N. Y.,) April 4, ‘46.—SUICIDE OF AN OLD MAN.—Yesterday afternoon a man about 70 years of age was discovered dead in the woods, about half a mile from Trumansburg.  He had taken life by a double process.  When found he was suspended by the neck with two strands of a rope from the limb of a tree.  A few steps from him lay his budget; upon it lay his knife and razor, the latter quite bloody.  His throat was cut in two place, but both too high, or near the chin to effect a speedy death.  Near his budget was a pool of blood, where he undoubtedly had sat and bled.  But finding so severe a struggle between life and death, he made a finishing stroke by hanging himself; though it can hardly be called hanging, for his knees touched the ground.  It appears that after cutting his throat he untwisted a small rope and took one strand, attached it to the limb of a tree, then made a slipping noose and placed his head through it; this was found broken.  He then took two strands, and succeeded in his object.  His name was David Baker.  I learn that he lived in Washington county, had a nice house and lot, and was withal a man of good character.

from The Boston Daily Atlas, (Boston, MA) Wednesday, April 29, 1846, pg. 1, col. E


THE BEREAVED CAT’S SUICIDE
(From the New York Times.)
A curious story of an animal deliberately committing suicide comes from a little village in the western part of this State.  A cat and a dog brought up together were great playmates and very fond of each other.  They were the pets of a family whose home was not far from a railroad track, and one day the dog raced over the rails too near an approaching train and was struck by the engine and instantly killed.  The cat was in full chase after him at the moment, and saw her playfellow meet his death.  She was inconsolable, refused her food and would not run or play about in answer to the children’s efforts to arouse her.  She strayed often down to the track where her friend was killed, and, finally, one day less than a week after the dog’s death, the cat leaped in front of an oncoming engine and was herself killed.
from The Weekly News and Courier, (Charleston, SC) Wednesday, October 28, 1896; pg. 9; col D 

THE BEREAVED CAT’S SUICIDE

(From the New York Times.)

A curious story of an animal deliberately committing suicide comes from a little village in the western part of this State.  A cat and a dog brought up together were great playmates and very fond of each other.  They were the pets of a family whose home was not far from a railroad track, and one day the dog raced over the rails too near an approaching train and was struck by the engine and instantly killed.  The cat was in full chase after him at the moment, and saw her playfellow meet his death.  She was inconsolable, refused her food and would not run or play about in answer to the children’s efforts to arouse her.  She strayed often down to the track where her friend was killed, and, finally, one day less than a week after the dog’s death, the cat leaped in front of an oncoming engine and was herself killed.

from The Weekly News and Courier, (Charleston, SC) Wednesday, October 28, 1896; pg. 9; col D